Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology


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Natural Product Research, vol. Journal of Applied Microbiology, vol. International Journal of Molecular Medicine, vol. Catalysis Communications, vol. Journal of Organometallic Chemistry, vol. Studies of the angiography sociology. I think that understanding a person and their religious background can provide valuable insight to how they might come about decisions and in some cases allow for a healthcare professional to influence how that patient will respond to a treatment proposal or results of a test. A benefit of having religious consideration for healthcare providers is that there are teachings from religious texts that are applicable to people not practicing that religion.

An example would be the practice of karma or ahimsa of a healthcare provider to a Catholic. Hi Pamela! Thank you for the summary and commentary on the readings. I liked how your explanation went more in depth on the narratives provided by the Mahabharata, because I think that as an influential text with interpretations relating to reproductive technologies, it parallels influential texts in other religions we have discussed such as the book of Genesis in Judaism and Christianity. I also saw a similarity between Hindu ethics and Jewish law in terms of their flexibility towards reproductive techniques for the sake of allowing mothers to have progeny.

I like a point you brought up from the reading about the emphasis Hinduism places on social parenthood rather than genetic parenthood. I think that this viewpoint allows for a lot more flexibility concerning reproductive techniques, especially in comparison with other major religions we have looked at such as Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. Hey Pamela, thank you for great blog post! I found it much easier to understand apply to reproductive technology when you related it to dharma, karma and ahimsa.

We have examined a number of religions in this class in regards to their view about ART. Hinduism is special because it seems to be less strict about what would be considered right or wrong in medical procedures. I think this reflects their values of acceptance, non-violence, and individual responsibility.

As you mentioned, Hinduism does not have a strict definition of the perfect family and thus followers are able to engage in certain reproductive technologies that those in other religions cannot. Those practicing the Hindu religion ultimately make decisions based on if it will contribute to the greater good of society now and even after death. While some might oppose these beliefs, I do believe that all medical professionals should be exposed to all religious views in order to fully understand a patient and to form a cultural competency toward them.

I do not believe that religious consideration should be left out of medical culture because most patients will seek guidance from a religious leader in order to make decisions about certain medical procedures. Thank you for a very well written and comprehensive post! I really enjoyed how you not only summarized the readings but also included personal input. Something that I found interesting were the threads of similarity on moral thought between Hindu, Jewish and Christian religions.

Similar to how the Bible is a moral guide, the Mahabharata is an influential text that guides individuals on dharma, which informs peoples behaviors, ahimsa, and karma. But as you point out, the moral guidelines explained in the Mahabharata are not constraints or rigid, rather places agency in the hands of the individuals rather than have strict definitions placed by God.


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  • This can be seen in the way that the Hindu stories place the power in the hands of the Matriarch almost as equally as the Gods or that there are no rigid rules defining kinship. When taking a class in Medical Anthropology, my first thought was that anyone going into the medical field should have a background in this. I believe that while in-depth knowledge of all religions and cultures is necessary for medical practitioners, I believed having some type of understanding is needed in order to understand the way that people perceive these reproductive technologies. With growing technology and differing views, by understanding the cultural context in which patients recognize these technologies is important in order to provide effective and efficient care.

    Magical progeny, modern technology : a Hindu bioethics of assisted reproductive technology

    Thanks for the excellent read. You did a great job discussing the key arguments by Bhattacharyya in her book. I really liked how you introduced the book as well as how you explained the key points. I found it interesting that western beliefs such as Christianity and Judaism focused on living within the confines of rules while the eastern beliefs such as Buddhism and Hinduism focused more on living according to certain concepts like dharma, dana, and karma.

    In response to your question, I believe that healthcare workers should be concerned primarily about the health aspect of the issue. Moral and religious considerations should be handled by the patient or a party such as a rabbi or pastor. However, I do believe that having a basic understanding of there different perspectives would greatly improve how workers inform their patients on the best treatment. Issues with communication are a major obstacle in the field of health as American patients come from such a wide variety of backgrounds and education levels.

    Having a general understanding of the different perspectives would definitely help towards this problem since the healthcare worker could better understand what choices the patient is more likely to make.

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    Thanks for your post. I think Pamela did a great job explaining what Bhattacharyya was trying to emphasize. I also wanted to address the common question of whether Buddhist and Hindu stances on bioethics will ever be taken into consideration. Personally, I doubt that they will ever be given as much consideration and importance in American bioethical debates as religions we have studied since they are a very small minority in America. Also, they are not a vocal minority; they tend to be more flexible in their beliefs than other cultures so perhaps they try less to make their position be known.

    However, I do value the importance of having clinicians understand religious and cultural contexts a little bit better. Thanks Pamala! I loved your discussion of Dharma and how this is essentially the central principle of morality in Hinduism. Truthfully, my past knowledge of Hinduism is limited and only really extends as far as Bhattacharya describes it in this book.

    In Christianity for example, you are judged at the end of your life by a divine power to determine if you deserve Heaven or Hell this is obviously an overgeneralization for the purpose of making an argument while I interpret dharma as more of a position on a spectrum between moral and immoral where your position moves based on your actions.

    Your final position, or Karma, determines your state of reincarnation. Additionally, while the Catholic Church has a set of rigid rules that make morality black and white, Hinduism relies on individual subjective decisions based on the stories of the Mahabharata. On the first hand, I feel as this could generate anxiety in making individual moral decisions. Without clear guides, I would imagine that individuals would worry about reproductive technologies such as abortions where the ethics are morally ambiguous.

    On the other hand, Hinduism allows for greater flexibility in making these decisions relative to organization with an authority such as the Catholic Church. As the American medical community is generally secular in patient care, I would imagine many doctors do not understand how Hinduism and thus have difficulty helping American Hindus make ethical decisions with respect to their culture. Hi Pamela, I hope your night is going well. I am impressed by how well you captured the main themes of the book.

    All in all, I thought Bhattacharya was extremely clear with her organization and structure of argument, and you followed suit with your blog post. I find it interesting that while we are certainly reading Hindu narratives, we are reading them as presented by Bhattacharya, who takes from them excerpts to make them palatable to the Western mind.

    I suppose that this reading is the closest I will get to fully understanding Hindu scripture, but it is noteworthy to recognize that even this reading offers me only a partial insight into a true Hindu understanding. Thank you for your response. I thought it was very comprehensive and really summed up the reading well.

    I wanted to focus on the last paragraph.

    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology
    Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology Magical Progeny, Modern Technology: A Hindu Bioethics of Assisted Reproductive Technology

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